The following explains Gender Impact on Connecticut DUI. Gender can also play a part in the elimination of alcohol. On average, women tend to eliminate alcohol at a rate that is 10% greater than men do. When a person has prolonged or heavy use of a drug, a tolerance develops. Therefore, alcohol gets eliminated at a faster pace.

Types of Tolerance

There are two types of tolerance that men and women should understand. The first is functional tolerance. This is a change in the organ or the system’s sensitivity to alcohol or drugs. It happens with chronic users of alcohol. Their system and organs have adapted to the abuse the chronic user has done over the years to the body. Their body has a functional tolerance to accept twice that of an average person. The second type of tolerance is called metabolic tolerance. Chronic users of alcohol can develop this type of tolerance. It will allow the rate of the metabolism of alcohol rise to a level 72% faster than the average person. In this tolerance, the person’s body constantly creates alcohol dehydrogenate. This is an enzyme which enables the body to process alcohol.

Alcohol in the Body

Chronic users can handle larger quantities of alcohol. But, studies have shown that they still have impairment at the .08% BAC level. Elimination of alcohol is processed by the liver, the last stop in the absorption and elimination process of alcohol. The majority of alcohol ingested gets eliminated through normal body metabolism. And, the remainder gets eliminated through excretion in one’s breath, urine, sweat, feces, and saliva. A normal person will eliminate alcohol at a rate of .5 oz of alcohol every hour; however, factors can affect this rate.

Alcohol elimination rate is inversely proportionate to the concentration of alcohol within the blood. If the concentration of alcohol is extremely high or low, the rate at which the body eliminates the alcohol tends to be much faster. As a person gets older, their ability to metabolize alcohol diminishes. But, alcoholics still tend to metabolize alcohol in their bodies much faster. If an individual consumes alcohol at a rate faster than the rate of elimination this will result in a higher blood alcohol concentration for a longer period of time.

Average Total Body Water as a Function of Sex and Age

Age Male Female
18 to 40 61% 52%
Over 60 51% 46%

On average, women tend to eliminate alcohol at a rate that is 10% greater than men do. When a person has prolonged or heavy use of a drug, a tolerance develops, and therefore, it gets eliminated at a faster pace. There are two types of tolerance that men and women should understand. The first is functional tolerance that can be described as a change in the organ or the system’s sensitivity to alcohol or drugs. This is seen with chronic users of alcohol where their system and organs have adapted to the abuse the chronic user has done over the years to the body that their body has a functional tolerance to accept twice that of an average person.

The second type of tolerance is called metabolic tolerance. Chronic users of alcohol can develop this type of tolerance and will allow the rate of the metabolism of alcohol rise to a level that is 72% faster than the average person. In this tolerance, the person’s body is constantly creating alcohol dehydrogenate, an enzyme which enables the body to process alcohol. Although chronic users can handle larger quantities of alcohol, studies have shown that they still have impairment at the .08% BAC level.

Elimination of Alcohol

The absorption and elimination of alcohol process ends with elimination of alcohol when it is processed by the liver. The majority of alcohol that is ingested is eliminated through normal body metabolism and the remainder is eliminated through excretion in one’s breath, urine, sweat, feces, and saliva. A normal person will eliminate alcohol at a rate of .5 oz of alcohol every hour; however, there are things that can affect that rate.

Alcohol elimination rate is inversely proportionate to the concentration of alcohol within the blood. If the concentration of alcohol is extremely high or low, the rate at which the body eliminates the alcohol tends to be much faster. As a person gets older, their ability to metabolize alcohol diminishes, but alcoholics still tend to metabolize alcohol in their bodies much faster. If an individual consumes alcohol at a rate faster than the rate of elimination, this will result in a higher blood alcohol concentration for a longer period of time. Alcohol also affects people differently depending on factors such as what they had to eat that day, when they last ate, if they drink water while consuming alcohol, and their mood.